Archive

Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

Home Cooking Inspired by Eat Pray Love

September 7, 2010 Leave a comment

Inspired by the recent release of Eat Pray Love featuring Julia Roberts, I went shopping at Whole Foods with Italian fare in mind.

(A quick summary of the movie: After a series of wrong relationships, the main character in the movie travels to Italy, India and Bali to find herself. In Italy, she learns to find passion in food. The movie highlights the simple fare of Italy, which reminds me of my travels there a decade ago. From my perspective, the food in Italy isn’t the best in the world. If you want that, France is a better country to visit. However, if you want a home-style and simple meal enjoyed by friends and family alike and savored into the long hours of the day and night with food and wine offerings (like in the movie), Italy provides that.)

So back to the Italian fare I’ve had right here at home in the US:

Prosciutto and melon
Rustic bread dipped in extra virgin olive oil, freshly grated parmesan cheese, and pepper flakes
Littleneck clams sauteed with lots of garlic, olive oil, white wine, sundried tomatoes, and onions

And… I still have homemade pasta in the pantry and will be adding simple marinara sauce and lots of that parmesan cheese to that for dinner tonight. Just add a glass of red wine and my dinner is complete!

Advertisements
Categories: Food, Kitchen

Turkey Extravaganza

December 2, 2009 Leave a comment

Thanksgiving has always been my absolute favorite holiday. This holiday kicks off the start of the entire holiday season and when done right, the sets the stage and the standard for the next wonderful couple of months.

This Thanksgiving, my family hosted by preparing the star of the show, the turkey, in addition to some essential sides such as mashed potatoes and cranberry relish.

Last year, I had the notion to prepare a free-range organic turkey brined in brown sugar, spices, and the like. No one was a fan but me. The turkey was lean, tender and believe it or not, it actually tasted like turkey! Alas, everyone demanded the staple Butterball turkey this year. I was very disappointed but we did what our family asked: brought back the Butterball.

This turkey day, it was my husband’s sole responsibility to cook the turkey. After days of thawing the frozen bird, my husband seasoned the outside layer of skin with butter, thyme, rosemary, and sage. He also rubbed this concoction under the skin by the breast just to be extra thorough. Then he baked the 22-pound sucker for four and a half hours, letting it rest for about an hour before serving it up with my killer cranberry relish and somewhat dry buttermilk mashed potatoes (very disappointing). Family added to the feast pot-luck style with hearty harvest bread stuffing with pecans and cranberries, to-die-for sweet and tasty bread pudding, candied yams topped with marshmallow, Cheasapeake Bay spiral glazed ham, homemade Philly style cheesecake, and topped it all off with the piece de resistance, a chunky, creamy gravy made by my sister-in-law with the yummy, fatty drippings from our Butterball turkey. YUMMMMM!

So let’s go back to my side dishes. The killer cranberry relish. This was made with fresh cranberries, sugar, water but I added fresh fruit (apple, pear, orange) and a variety of dried fruits as well. It turned out to be sweet, somewhat tart, but not too tart, and full of rich fruity texture. The natural red color looked fabulous in a white serving bowl intermingled with the rest of the spread.

The disappointing mashed potatoes… Well, my only excuse is that they were mashed up too soon. I prepared this dish probably an hour prior to dinner and left them on the range at low heat. I think the moisture just evaporated from the dish and left it dry and wanting. Lesson learned: make the mash just before serving. I made this same dish last year and it was very moist and full of flavor. I used Yukon gold potatoes, boiling them til they fell apart when separated with a knife. Then I mashed with a masher; following up with a ricer to finely mash it to the consistency I liked. I kept the mash on the range at low-med, adding room temp buttermilk and cooled melted butter. As we had lots of it for leftovers, I have been constantly reminded about the poor quality of my mashed potatoes for days afterwards. Ek!

And yet the festivities did not end on Turkey Day because I continued to cook up a storm by roasting prime rib the following day. I got a particularly juicy cut on sale at Safeway for half the usual price. Quite a bargain for a 9 pound rib roast! When it came time to cook, my husband took over with the preparation by seasoning this with olive oil, sage, rosemary and thyme, all finely mixed in the food processor. I came in at this point to make sure it cooked ok. The rib roast was baked for a little under 2 hours at 500 degrees and then I let it rest in the cooling oven for an hour before the whole family dug in for dinner. Although prepared in such a high-temp, quick roasting style (mostly due to lack of time), the rib roast actually came out pretty good. I think most folks tend to slow cook a rib roast so it’s evenly cooked and tender. This fast and lazy approach is not part of my M.O. however my husband and I received rave reviews that this was the best rib roast we’ve made so far. The ends were well done, for those who preferred it that way. The middle was medium rare and just perfect for those who preferred it like that. It was a win-win situation.

And on the final day of our eating marathon, we had plans to eat with friends who spent half a day (12 hours) preparing a turducken (chicken stuffed in a duck stuffed in a turkey) dinner. It was quite an ordeal! The turducken was prepared with (the discoverer of turducken) Chef Paul Prudhomme’s Cajun recipe. (Quick Side Note: Chef P founded the K Paul Restaurant in New Orleans which I have personally been to and I have to admit, it was definitely quite delicious and worth the wait. I say worth the wait because I swear every time I passed by that restaurant, there was a line outside the door.) At any rate, the turducken was quite yummy although I think I prefer all three fowl prepared and served separately. In my opinion, the best part of a duck and chicken is the crispy, flavorful skin and you just kind of lose all that with the two birds stuffed inside the turkey the way they are. The skin and meat all melded into one moist, spicy Cajun style dish. But I felt the loss of crispiness and the unique duck-like or chicken-like flavor was a huge one. Not that I’m disappointed in the dish at all. Far from it. It was still pretty good don’t get me wrong but I’m not as big a fan as I thought I’d be… Who’d have figure?! At any rate, the sides were outstanding! The mac and cheese was creamy, cheesy and easy to pile on. The side salad with roasted cashews, sliced pears and fresh spinach was nice and light, a perfect accompaniment for the turducken. The natural and fresh minced cranberry relish topped with sweet mandarin oranges was gorgeous and tasted like it looked. And the rest was just a blur at this point because I was stuffed to the gills after days of eating all of my favorite holiday foods done up in all the creative ways folks can think of.

Can you tell that I just love this holiday?! And I really can’t wait until the next eating frenzy, come Christmas! Bring it on!

Iceberry Frozen Yogurt

October 23, 2009 Leave a comment

Since this summer, my husband has been addicted to probiotic frozen yogurt (froyo) especially the most convenient froyo shop, Iceberry. He orders it plain without any toppings and can eat some everyday. Is there a reason why this stuff is so addictive? I myself can do without it. I don’t particularly like the tart aftertaste of the yogurt. At any rate, we’ve tried to buy the stuff in bulk from a variety of grocery stores, Trader Joes, Whole Foods, Giant, etc. Nothing even comes close except Yo Baby plain yogurt (tart but not sweet) and greek plain yogurt (tart but not as sweet), and they are still miles away from the flavor of the probiotic frozen yogurt that seems to be all the rage. The search for grocery store brand frozen yogurt continues! Please help…

Categories: Food Tags: , ,

Dinner at Hell’s Kitchen in Minneapolis, MN

October 21, 2009 Leave a comment

With no association to the Hell’s Kitchen show on television, this red and black hell-themed restaurant welcomes guests with a mix of ghoul and goth; knives and assorted cutlery lead you down the stairs (appropriately) into hell, or the restaurant’s interpretation of it. Chandeliers with hanging spoons and forks, vased branches lined with black crows, black sheer curtains, black leather wingback chairs, thought provoking dark images along the walls were just some of the things that went into building up the hellish theme. The food is far from hellish however. For a pre-dinner teaser, the group I went to dinner with sampled Hell’s Kitchen’s homemade peanut butter and marmalades. When it came time to order dinner, a friend and I split the baked penne dish and the huevos rancheros. The baked penne dish comes with your choice of vegetable or meats. We chose the shrimp. Tasty and cheesy. Good for a cool rainy evening’s meal. Also good all the time is breakfast foods which is served all day at Hell’s Kitchen! Wonderful for breakfast lovers such as myself. This dish of eggs, beans, cheese, tomato sauce, and potato hash is beautifully layered and served on top of a flaky and crunchy tortilla shell. This is their signature breakfast dish and it is worth ordering! Unfortunately, I’m sad to report that there was no more room in me for dessert so can’t speak to their desserts.

Jimmy John’s Deli in Minneapolis, MN

October 21, 2009 Leave a comment

So today I arrived in downtown Minneapolis, MN for a work-related meeting. Hungry, I explore the neighborhood around the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel. It’s about lunch time and I spy a Melting Pot Restaurant, a Hell’s Kitchen, and Jimmy John’s a deli. I’m craving a sandwich, I think.

So after sitting down and wolfing down half my sandwich, I think: OMG, the seven grain bread that this deli uses for their sandwiches is like nothing I’ve had before at a deli. About 1 inch thick and full of healthy goodness, it definitely makes my turkey sandwich (turkey, sprouts, tomato, cheese, mayo, and peppers) POP! Already quite satisfied with just the half sandwich, I’m saving the other half to snack on later. The bread looks like it will not get as soggy from the mayo after hours of sitting. We shall see.

I can’t wait to see what else is around. I’ve heard Brit’s Pub is a little piece of London. There are also a number of steakhouses down the street so I’ll need to check out the menu for anything that stands out as a gotta-have meal.

Fall Weather Soup Recipes

October 20, 2009 Leave a comment

As summer comes to an abrupt end, the weather has shifted for the worse. With the cold and dreary weather, I’ve been inspired to make lots of quick and hearty soups. Most recently, smoked turkey drumstick and kale soup, an easy go-to recipe for a quick weekday meal. The majority of the 30-minute cook time is reserved for stewing the drumstick to get the juices into the broth. The kale cooks rather quickly once the broth is flavorful enough. Salt and pepper is added to taste. Chili flakes are optional.

Another easy soup recipe is chicken and rice soup. Boil some chicken (I like the dark meat of chicken thigh and drumstick but when I’m feeling particularly healthy, I use chicken breast) and lightly salt to flavor the broth. For more flavor, you may want to boil the chicken in chicken broth or add chicken bouillon/flavoring to the water. After the chicken is cooked, remove and tear the meat into chunks. Add a small amount of uncooked jasmine or other white rice (about half a cup to 3/4 cups). Add chicken chunks and simmer the rice soup for 15-20 minutes. The rice should be tender and soft. Add salt and fish sauce to taste. You may add finely chopped green onion and cilantro to top off the dish. The total cook time is usually 20-25 minutes for me.

My final go-to recipe is beef noodle soup or pho. For a large pot (about 8 servings), I buy the beef bones at the grocery store for under $5. The bones go into a big pot of water and sit on medium high heat for about an hour. Season with salt. Also, if you want to get a more complex tasting pho, you may add a couple cinnamon sticks, some star anise, a peeled stub of ginger root, some garlic cloves and a whole onion. For more flavor, you may add beef bouillon or pho flavor (which you can get in jars at most Asian stores). When done, pour some broth over cooked rice noodles. Add the optional beef meatballs, thinly sliced beef (that can cook in the hot broth), shrimp, cilantro and thinly sliced white/yellow onions.

Enjoy the fall weather!

Categories: Food, Recipes Tags: , ,

Anniversary Celebration at the Four Seasons Hotel

October 1, 2009 Leave a comment

Happy 2nd Anniversary to Us!

For our 2 year anniversary, we celebrated at the Four Seasons Hotel Bourbon Steak Restaurant one of the fancier digs in Georgetown (DC) so it is with my nose tipped in the air as I write this restaurant review. Champagne courtesy of the restaurant kicked off our anniversary dinner;  a complimentary sampling of snazzy fries and specialty dips soon followed. The must have appetizer of tuna tartare served tableside recommended by the waiter was a let-down. The presentation was excellent but the dish was not outstanding or memorable; I really liked the added touch of the quail egg cracked by the server on top of the neat stack of tuna, for purposes of tenderizing the meat, I assume. YUM! Despite the disappointing first course, our main courses made up for the fries and the tuna and then some. My husband dined on tender duck breast accompanied with foie gras and I enjoyed a perfectly prepared 10 oz medium rare filet mignon, served with truffle mac and cheese and golden mashed potatoes, truly masterful and gourmet versions of the classic soul/comfort foods. (I must admit that this restaurant has the best filet I’ve ever had, better than Ruth Chris, Charlie Palmer, among other steakhouses in the area.) We were quite pleased with our selections and are already coming up with new celebrations as excuses to go back for some more deliciousness. We topped off our palates with a shared dessert of tiramisu (again unique presentation, nothing special).

And on my last note, I have to include that we celebrated here last year before the Four Seasons renovated and installed a new restaurant on the main level.  It used to be that for dinner, the restaurant on the lower level had more of that private, intimate, somewhat romantic ambiance. Now the lower level is only open for breakfast and lunch, or so I’ve been told. The ambiance of the new restaurant is more contemporary, lounge-like and less intimate. Just a note….